Heaven’s Lost Property

November 6, 2012 in Anime, General Reviews by The Droid

Animes have been known for pushing the envelope, and this one is no exception, except that it is so thoroughly honest about one man’s perversion. But when you dress like that, well, what did you REALLY expect? I mean, did you really expect that outfit to contain all your feminine charms? Did you honestly expect that a man who wears panties on his head is not going to blow a gasket or two? Adding to this is the Naïve Factor and this show serves it up with two hot, heaping scoops.

Oh, for those who don’t know, the Naïve Factor is that the woman in question has absolutely NO IDEA that they are sexy. For guys, you have read the comments that accompany the photos in any girly magazine or see the picture and she is totally amazed that she possesses the prodigious protuberances, as if she had never noticed them before! Yeah, it’s kinda like that in the show.

Tomoki Sakurai (that Chibi, panty-on-head wearing guy in the center) is a teenage guy whose motto is “Peace and quiet is the best”, but he finds it difficult when he has to put up with Sohara Mitsuki, his next door neighbor with a killer karate chop (not seen up there); Eishiro Sugata, an eccentric pseudo-scientist bent on discovering the “New World” (not seen either); and Mikako Satsukitane, a sadistic Student Council President (also not seen).

One day, while he was witnessing a strange anomaly in the sky, an UMA (Unidentified Mysterious Animal) crash-lands nearby. Tomoki discovers what fell from the sky is a winged female humanoid named Ikaros, (white wings to the right) who soon declares herself to be Tomoki’s servant. From then on, more creatures known as “Angeloids” arrive, and with this, he finds himself losing his peace and quiet, but at the same time finds pleasant things the Angeloids bring him.

The rather plain one in the back is Nymph (Electronic Warfare Angeloid, Type Beta). Now, she has issues. Nymph’s original mission is to retrieve Ikaros and return her to Synapse, however, she is physically weaker and fails to the mission after awakening Ikaros’s Uranus Queen ability, and is consequently heavily punished and abused by HER boss up in heaven (for want of a better term; he is called the Master of Synapse). After spending time with Tomoki and his friends, she begins to like humans, and soon develops feelings for Tomoki, albeit in a stand-offish manner.

Astraea is that very large-chested one (Ooops. They are all rather fleshy; the one in blue. Close-Combat Angeloid, Type Delta). She was sent by Synapse to kill Tomoki and return everyone home. She is strong in combat and emotion compared to Ikaros, but because of that allocation, her weakness is her low processing power, and the other Angeloids consider her an idiot; this is affirmed when she bungles her multiple chances to kill Tomoki at the Buddhist temple, and later at the quiz show where she cannot even answer correctly basic questions.

She eventually severs her contact with Master to live with everyone. The show looks at the major perversion Tomoki engages in (and pays a heavy price FOR engaging in such behaviors) as well as the on-going struggles of the Angeloids. Now, I saw both seasons as a straight run, although you could take a break between the two. As they do run somewhat independent of each other and have really different story lines, it’s your call. I do sometimes like a tiny pause for a breather.

Eishiro offers some rather interesting comments that seem rather off-base, but are amusing enough to consider, but his earthly friends find it odd that he lives at the river a lot of the time. Sohara comes in on Tomoki when he is engaged in some caliber of perversion and is forced to kick the waffles out of him for it, so we have a good entry in the yelling and screaming comedy. Things do turn serious near the end of the first season, and again at the second, but it does help to solidify the comedic aspect of the show.

Despite the depth of the perversions he has (and I do not wish to reveal a single one of them, as those episodes are really hilarious), Tomoki is really a pretty decent guy who just doesn’t have a grasp on the big picture. He learns, though.
On a scale of 1 to 10:

Artwork           9 (Oucha m’goucha!)
Plot                  6 (Gets overworked)
Pacing              8 (Can turn frenetic fast)
Effectiveness    8 (It does work, despite distractions)
Conclusion       7 (It does end, but it is more of a ‘save point’)
Fan Service      8 (A similar show would be “Sekerei”)

Overall            7 (Needs to commit better to its ‘dramedy’ roots)

And remember, it’s first run until you’ve seen it. Peace and quiet is the best.

The Droid

About The Droid

Stephen King has written 222 post in this blog.

It actually took me about 40 years to finally get an appreciation for anime, through numerous flirtations and false starts. Whether the stories matured or I did, I now follow it with some zeal.