Short Run Series VI – Not a “Puni” Show

April 2, 2012 in Anime, General Reviews, Puni Puni Poemy, Short Run Series by The Droid

I have an assumption that with a short-run show, since you are not really coming back to anything and you are going to crash and burn somewhere on the journey, you can go all out and leave only destruction in your wake. It’s just that the opportunity to see these kinds of shows are limited and if you do not know what to look for (or where to find it) a lot of stuff gets passed over. And since many channels are not going to take on a four- or six-segment show, it behooves you to find it. Oh, and this one is only two episodes, so you are really on your own to try and get to it.

Puni Puni Poemy” is brought to you by the same maniacs that delivered “Excel Saga”. (In fact, in one Excel episode, they make reference to this show). It has all the hallmarks one sees in a short run: perversity, insanity, pointlessness, massive fan service and a ‘take no prisoners’ attitude. In this show, it works, but you will be scratching your head a lot. And it is an intentional two episodes. Think of one of those inverted roller coaster, but with no safety equipment. It’s all up to you to hang on.

The plot (such as it is) tells of the over-energetic Poemy Watanabe (that maniac, front and center), who rushes to school to be the first one there when the new semester begins. Her only dream is to become a voice actress for anime. Alas, she is beaten to the punch to be first at school when her best girl friend, Futaba Aasu, is already there, spending the night, using a couple of desks as a makeshift bed). Upon returning from school that day, Poemy is devastated to learn that her parents have been killed and the house destroyed (don’t worry; it is very funny). Futaba then asks Poemy to move in with her six other sisters. But the forces of mayhem are still about.

A giant robot attacks the city and we learn that the six sisters are, in reality, Sol III, a group of super-powered heroines dedicated to protecting the earth. But their powers are strictly defensive, so they cannot attack, which means they are, for the most part, completely worthless. Poemy somehow obtains a magical fish and transforms into…Puni Puni Poemy, who kind of defeats the robot.

Episode Two? Forget it, as it is so completely over the top and beyond the fringe that any attempt to describe it is going to fail when you actually do see it. This series, much like “Kekko Kamen” (and it comes from the same loons) is wild girls gone wild. It is overly fast-paced, extremely perverted (I do not want to talk about the pantless space aliens; they have to be seen) and makes no sense whatsoever. Because of this, it really is a good time.

Once in a while, you have to have a dumb anime, just something to watch and get a good laugh at. This is that show. And if you have a good eye in identifying female anime characters, you will have a marvelous time with the opening sequence in Episode One.

On a scale of 1 to 10:

Artwork            7 (It suffices and that’s what is needed)
Plot                   2 (OK, you could cobble something together, but it’s best to let it go)
Pacing               9 (Doesn’t it come up for air?)
Effectiveness     7 (For what it is, it functions)
Conclusion        7 (A conclusion)
Fan Service       6 (A similar show would “Mahoromatic”)

Overall              8 (Madcap madhouse)

And remember, it’s first run until you’ve seen it. And, boy, does it ever run!

The Droid

About The Droid

Stephen King has written 194 post in this blog.

It actually took me about 40 years to finally get an appreciation for anime, through numerous flirtations and false starts. Whether the stories matured or I did, I now follow it with some zeal.